Indonesia Earthquake & Tsunami Relief Enters New Stage CEDAR Continues to Help the Affected on Recovery

Banner image: CEDAR’s Indonesia’s partner, PESAT, meets with representatives of an affected community and talk about their livelihood needs

CEDAR and its local partner completed the first phase of relief work (until November 2018) in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, where earthquake and tsunami hit last September. CEDAR allocated a fund of 20,000 US Dollars (around HK$150,000) to support its partner, PESAT, in the first phase to distribute emergency food, cooking kits, hygiene kits and medication to 1,347 affected families.

Last November, chief executive of CEDAR Fund, Dr. Raymond Kwong and two staff visited Sulawesi, and learned about partner’s post-disaster work, visited the affected people, and explored further response work through our partner. After a few days of visitation, observation, and evaluation in the affected communities and disaster areas, we identified three major needs of the affected communities: livelihood, education, and psychosocial well-being.

In response of the needs of the affected, CEDAR will be allocating 44,000 US Dollars (approximately HK$340,000**) to PESAT for the next phase of work in the first half year of 2019. The work include:

  • Livelihood recovery: Provide fishing boats and fishing equipment to coastal communities; support women to process fish for selling in market; provide livestock and farming tools for rural communities, and provide training on the use of organic fertilisers
  • Education: Construct temporary schools with water and sanitation facilities
  • Psychosocial support: Distribute nutritious food to children participating in trauma healing sessions

This phase of work focuses on benefiting over 3,000 people, especially those who have lost the breadwinner of the house and vulnerable women and children.

Read CEDAR’s staff trip sharing

Remarks:

*In late September 2018, a 7.5-magnitude earthquake followed by tsunami devastated central Sulawesi, Indonesia, the local communities lost their homes and loved ones overnight. CEDAR immediately contacted its local partner and appealed to churches in Hong Kong for support. Thanks to all supported churches and supporters, as of January 2019, CEDAR has received HK$900,000 for responding to the disaster in Sulawesi. CEDAR will commit the remaining funds to this specific relief programme in order to assist the affected communities in Sulawesi, and is in the process of reviewing project proposals from other partners. Please stay tuned for further updates. For enquiries, please contact (852)2381 9627.

Let’s remember the people of central Sulawesi through prayers and gifts!

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  1. CEDAR is an approved charitable institution and trust of a public character under section 88 of the Inland Revenue Ordinance. Please visit Inland Revenue Department website for details.
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If the donation exceeds the above mentioned allocation of funds, the excess amount will be transferred to CEDAR’s ‘Emergency Relief and Disaster Preparedness Fund’. The fund will enable us to respond to immediate needs, and support disaster mitigation in poor nations always being hit by disasters to reduce the amount of devastation.